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Aftercare

According to the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015 (JJ Act 2015), aftercare refers to ‘making provision of support, financial or otherwise, to persons, who have completed the age of eighteen years but have not completed twenty-one years, and have left any institutional care to join the mainstream of society’. Aftercare can be termed as a preparatory stage for young adults during which they are provided financial support, training in skills, handholding for career development, counselling for managing emotions and such other measures that contribute to the process of their social mainstreaming. It is the final stage in the continuum of care of institutionalized children. They are not left alone after completion of stay in institutions but are helped for a certain duration to enable their reintegration in the society. (Aftercare, Udayan Care and UNICEF India Country Office, 2016)


RESOURCES

  • LEAVING CARE POLICY DEVELOPMENT: A policy brief for practitioners
    Udayan Care, SOS Children’s Villages, University of Hildesheim and Kinderperspectief , 2021

    The process of leaving care is a transnational and global challenge. Even though there are several variations between care-leaving policies and the availability of support worldwide, the challenges faced by Care Leavers are similar everywhere. While there is enough evidence to show that organisations that effectively engage with children and young persons in co-creating their practices are most effective, it must be ensured that such participation is true and not mere tokenistic in nature. The involvement of Care Leavers in policy making, decision making and working for their best interest is the best way that societies can contribute towards their betterment. This policy brief puts together the key guiding principles that all organisations working with and for care leavers must keep in mind, as expressed by Care Leavers themselves, during the 1st International Care Leavers Convention 2020.

  • Leaving Care Policy Development: A brief for policy makers
    Udayan Care, SOS Children’s Villages, University of Hildesheim and Kinderperspectief, 2021

    The process of leaving care is a transnational and global challenge. Even though there are several variations between care-leaving policies and the availability of support worldwide, the challenges faced by Care Leavers are similar everywhere. Most countries lack a clear policy on leaving care. Care Leavers often become nobody’s responsibility and data systems in most countries are not well established. Consequently, most Care Leavers worldwide face challenges in housing, education, employment, mental health and psycho-social wellbeing and social support networks. A policy on leaving care must primarily aim to improve the life opportunities of Care Leavers as they transition to independent living. Any such policy must aim to improve their life outcomes and prepare them to leave care smoothly; support their active participation in decision making, and provide adequate and appropriate aftercare support. This policy brief puts together the key guiding principles that can support policy makers while developing policies on leaving care, as expressed by Care Leavers themselves, during the 1st International Care Leavers Convention 2020.

  • First International Care Leavers' Convention: Event Report
    Udayan Care, SOS Children’s Villages, University of Hildesheim and Kinderperspectief , 2021

    Udayan Care (India), SOS Children’s Villages, University of Hildesheim (Germany) and Kinderperspectief (Netherlands) joined hands in March 2020 to convene the first-ever international convention for Care Leavers, and it was planned in New Delhi, India, in March 2020. The organising committee closely observed the developments from March to August and continued to virtually meet and engage with the Care Leavers transnationally. A landscape survey was followed by a series of webinars from June-July with 100 young Care Leavers globally to understand the challenges they were going through during the pandemic and their needs around COVID-19. 11 gaps were identified, thus setting forth a set of recommendations in the form of “Care Leavers Declaration” to mitigate these risks. This report is a compilation of different stages of the whole convention, its various components and discussions which happened across the two months period and aims to serve as a guidebook for Care Leaver networks and organizations working with Care Leavers to seek inputs from, as well as for policymakers to understand this cohort better to develop policies in keeping with their dreams and aspirations. The report hopefully would serve as a tool for the planning of the next International Care Leavers Convention in 2022, led by Care Leavers themselves.