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Aftercare

According to the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015 (JJ Act 2015), aftercare refers to ‘making provision of support, financial or otherwise, to persons, who have completed the age of eighteen years but have not completed twenty-one years, and have left any institutional care to join the mainstream of society’. Aftercare can be termed as a preparatory stage for young adults during which they are provided financial support, training in skills, handholding for career development, counselling for managing emotions and such other measures that contribute to the process of their social mainstreaming. It is the final stage in the continuum of care of institutionalized children. They are not left alone after completion of stay in institutions but are helped for a certain duration to enable their reintegration in the society. (Aftercare, Udayan Care and UNICEF India Country Office, 2016)


RESOURCES

  • Supporting Youth Leave Care: A Study of Aftercare Practices in Maharashtra (2019)
    Udayan Care, Tata Trusts, and UNICEF, 2019

    Current Aftercare Practices (CAP) is a research study conducted in the State of Maharashtra and is part of a multistate study conducted in Delhi, Gujarat, Karnataka, and Rajasthan. The CAP study is an Udayan Care initiative, supported and funded by UNICEF, Tata Trusts and other partners; and is based on the premise that every child who leaves an Alternative Care setting on completing 18 years of age (or becomes a ‘Care Leaver’) needs extended support in the form of Aftercare. The CAP study gathers evidence through a scientific data collection process, consolidates knowledge and promising practices, and discusses gaps and challenges from multi-stakeholders’ perspective. At various stages, the study has employed participatory methods to incorporate the voices of CLs and critical feedback from key stakeholders and experts. The report covers a total of 107 CLs from Maharashtra, comprising of 74 males and 33 females, from both Government and Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO) run Child Care Institutions (CCIs). The key findings of the study show that Maharashtra has a rich historical background of Aftercare, yet there is tremendous scope for further development. Although, much is happening on Aftercare in the State, there are many areas where we, as duty-bearers, need to rise to the call to meet the aspirations of the CLs.

  • Supporting Youth Leave Care: A Study of Aftercare Practices, in Rajasthan (2019)
    Udayan Care, Child Resource Centre HCM Rajasthan State Institute of Public Administration, Tata Trusts, and UNICEF, 2019

    Current Aftercare Practices (CAP) is a research study conducted in the State of Rajasthan and is part of a multistate study conducted in Delhi, Gujarat, Karnataka, and Maharashtra. The CAP study is an Udayan Care initiative, supported and funded by UNICEF, Tata Trusts and other partners; and is based on the premise that every child who leaves an Alternative Care setting on completing 18 years of age (or becomes a ‘Care Leaver’) needs extended support in the form of Aftercare. The CAP study gathers evidence through a scientific data collection process, consolidates knowledge and promising practices, and discusses gaps and challenges from multi-stakeholders’ perspective. At various stages, the study has employed participatory methods to incorporate the voices of CLs and critical feedback from key stakeholders and experts. The report covers a total of 98 young adults from Rajasthan, comprising of 40 males and 58 females CLs, from both Government and NGO-run Child Care Institutions (CCIs) and 17 youth who, as children, availed the benefits under the Palanhar scheme of the Rajasthan Government. A total of 25 key informants were also interviewed as part of the study. Currently, Aftercare provision under the JJ Act and its Rules is meant only for CLs exiting from CCIs and is not applicable for Palanhar beneficiaries in the State. Although much work on child protection is happening in the State, there are many areas, one of them being Aftercare, where duty bearers need to rise to the call to meet the aspirations of the youth and CLs.

  • Aftercare For Young Adult Orphans
    Pune International Center, 2019

    After reaching 18 years, children in CCIs are required to leave and often fall off the radar. This lack of visibility in aftercare is an area of concern in India, and there are yawning gaps in the 'Aftercare' service of these Care Leavers, many of whom are orphans. They face heightened challenges and poorer outcomes on the journey to independence, not only because of their fractured pasts but also due to a lack of planned interventions towards preparing them for life out of CCIs. They face severe issues of shelter, sustenance, documentation of identity, continuing education and finding employment Given the importance of developing a holistic policy for the aftercare of young adult orphans; PIC decided to undertake a study in collaboration with STAPI, a nodal agency designated by the Government of Maharashtra.